Quotes by Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, 1895, Act I

The truth is rarely pure and never simple.

Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, 1895, Act I

To lose one parent, Mr Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness.

Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, 1895, Act I

Other Great Authors


Many forms of Government have been tried, and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.

Sir Winston Churchill

Creativity often consists of merely turning up what is already there. Did you know that right and left shoes were thought up only a little more than a century ago

Bernice Fitz-Gibbon

When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative.

Martin Luther King Jr.

Praise in the beginning is agreeable enough; and we receive it as a favor; but when it comes in great quantities, we regard it only as a debt, which nothing but our merit could extort.

James Goldsmith

Gentlemen, you are now about to embark on a course of studies which will occupy you for two years. Together, they form a noble adventure. But I would like to remind you of an important point. Nothing that you will learn in the course of your studies will be of the slightest possible use to you in after life, save only this, that if you work hard and intelligently you should be able to detect when a man is talking rot, and that, in my view, is the main, if not the sole, purpose of education.

John Alexander Smith, Speech to Oxford University students, 1914 »

If you can impress any man with an absorbing conviction of the supreme importance of some moral or religious doctrine if you can make him believe that those who reject that doctrine are doomed to eternal perdition if you then give that man power, and by means of his ignorance blind him to the ulterior consequences of his own act,-he will infallibly persecute those who deny his doctrine.

Henry Thomas Buckle »