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Are you sure? yes no

Did Plato know about the Old Testament?

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Dr. Joel M. Hoffman 1128862224Sun, 09 Oct 2005 12:50:24 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all,

In response to a question a student of mine asked, I'm trying to learn
how much, if at all, Plato may have been aware of anything from the
Old Testament.

Does anyone here know:

1) if Plato expressly mentions anything from the Old Testament, and if
   so, what?

2) if Plato obliquely refers to the Old Testament?

3) where I might find more information about this?

Many thanks.

-Joel
Vadim Cherny 1128885520Sun, 09 Oct 2005 19:18:40 +0000 (UTC)
None at all. Louis Feldman discusses possible philosophical borrowings at 
some length in "Jew and Gentile in the Ancient World," which are clear 
(which way, though?) in any case.

Vadim Cherny
> In response to a question a student of mine asked, I'm trying to learn > how much, if at all, Plato may have been aware of anything from the > Old Testament. > > Does anyone here know: > > 1) if Plato expressly mentions anything from the Old Testament, and if > so, what? > > 2) if Plato obliquely refers to the Old Testament? > > 3) where I might find more information about this? > > Many thanks. > > -Joel > > >
George Athas 1128915892Mon, 10 Oct 2005 03:44:52 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Joel!

Just a suggestion: Philo is very interested in Plato, and seems to find
Plato all through the Torah. I know the connection you're looking for is
the other way around (Hebrew Bible to Plato), but research into Philo
might turn up something regarding the other way, too.


Best regards, 
GEORGE ATHAS 
(Sydney, Australia)
> -----Original Message----- > From: George Athas
> -----Original Message----- > From: George Athas [mailto:b-hebrew-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org] On Behalf > Of Vadim Cherny > Sent: 10 October 2005 5:19 am > To: Dr. Joel M. Hoffman; b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org > Subject: Re: [b-hebrew] Did Plato know about the Old Testament? > > None at all. Louis Feldman discusses possible philosophical borrowings
at
> some length in "Jew and Gentile in the Ancient World," which are clear > (which way, though?) in any case. > > Vadim Cherny > > > In response to a question a student of mine asked, I'm trying to
learn
> > how much, if at all, Plato may have been aware of anything from the > > Old Testament. > > > > Does anyone here know: > > > > 1) if Plato expressly mentions anything from the Old Testament, and
if
> > so, what? > > > > 2) if Plato obliquely refers to the Old Testament? > > > > 3) where I might find more information about this? > > > > Many thanks. > > > > -Joel > > > > > > > > _______________________________________________ > b-hebrew mailing list > b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org > http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-h...
Schmuel 1128933132Mon, 10 Oct 2005 08:32:12 +0000 (UTC)
Hi b-hebrew,
George Athas wrote: >Hi Joel! Just a suggestion: Philo is very interested in Plato, and seems to find Plato all through the Torah. I know the connection you're looking for is the other way around (Hebrew Bible to Plato), but research into Philo might turn up something regarding the other way, too.
Schmuel I had the same thought and skimmed the entries from "The Works of Philo". Didn't find anything yet. However I am quite sure I remember hearing the theory coming through Philo that the Greeks had learned from the Hebrews (and by implication their scriptures). Now.. to find a quote. And then, if found, we have to evaluate :-) Wait.. google to the rescue. Here is the Stromata..Clement of Alexandria. At least in the ballpark. http://www.ccel.org/fathers2/ANF-02/anf02-57.... Of all these, by far the oldest is the Jewish race; and that their philosophy committed to writing has the precedence of philosophy among the Greeks, the Pythagorean Philo shows at large; and, besides him, Aristobulus the Peripatetic, and several others, not to waste time, in going over them by name. Very clearly the author Megasthenes, the contemporary of Seleucus Nicanor, writes as follows in the third of his books, On Indian Affairs: "All that was said about nature by the ancients is said also by those who philosophise beyond Greece: some things by the Brahmins among the Indians, and others by those called Jews in Syria. http://www.ccel.org/fathers2/ANF-02/anf02-57.... "Ye that thirst, go to the waters," says Esaias, And "drink water from thine own vessels," Solomon exhorts. Accordingly in "The Laws," the philosopher who learned from the Hebrews, Plato, commands husbandmen not to irrigate or take water from others, until they have first dug down in their own ground to what is called the virgin soil, and found it dry Shalom, Steven Avery Queens, NY http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Messianic_Apolo...
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