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New Fish Creek State Park, MT?

Ad
Lanny R 1265823487Wed, 10 Feb 2010 17:38:07 +0000 (UTC)
Snowbird Mine safe?
Granite Creek-Lolo smoky quartz area...?

The State of Montana, (Fish & Wildlife and State Parks) are planning  
on finalizing the purchase of 41,000 acres of forest land from the  
Nature Conservancy. The lands lie along the Fish Creek drainage which  
many of you are familiar with as the access to Surveyors Creek to get  
to the Snowbird Mine. The involved lands also extend south over the  
pass all the way to the Lolo Pass highway and thus the Granite Creek- 
Lolo smoky quartz area. These were lands formerly owned by Plum Creek  
timber company and were mostly the checkerboard lands from the old  
railroad grant that Burlington Northern had and spun off as the Plum  
Creek timber company. Thus the involved lands run from I-90 south to  
the Lolo highway and are mostly along Fish Creek and Granite Creek but  
extend northeast to Alberton.

A State Park is proposed for 11, 000 acres and the news release  
implies that this would be in the north end somewhere, south of I-90  
near "Alberton Gorge." I don't know exactly where the gorge is, unless  
they mean the narrow area where I-90 passes through on the Clark Fork  
River.

I could not find any maps showing the total lands locations involved,  
am only guessing from the description and the past land ownership of  
the Plum Creek lands.

It looks like this should have no impact on the Snowbird Mine, that is  
fully within the National Forest. Granite Creek Lolo is another story  
though. That is a checkerboard area so 1 square mile blocks of land in  
the smoky quartz area are involved. Those who have collected there  
know that Plum Creek put on some restrictions to access and  
collecting, but apparently never really enforced them, so you know  
where these lands are.

The problem is, that in Montana, State lands are not accessible by the  
public. Montana State lands are closed to access without a permit and  
generally, there are no rockhounding permits. The only exceptions are  
you can enter the lands to hunt if you have a valid hunting license,  
to fish if you have a valid fishing license, etc. The public cannot  
even walk across Montana State lands. So, watch out, the old Plum  
Creek portions of Granite Creek-Lolo may end up being closed.

Regards,

Lanny
Tim 1265829331Wed, 10 Feb 2010 19:15:31 +0000 (UTC)
Lanny, the map is here:
http://www.themontanalegacyproject.org/docume...

I don't know which the 41,000 acres are but it might be the northern block
if I read the press release right, it is on either side if the Clark Fork.
At 640 acres/sq. mi. that's 64 checkerboard squares on the nose, maybe you
could count them LOL. It was a PITA dealing with them on a couple projects I
did up there, so good riddance to Plum Creek. Sounds like the state might
not be any better. Reminds me of Arizona. Makes me even happier to be here
in good ol' Oregon where I can tromp all over state timber lands and not be
worried about getting cited for dirt diggling. 

Tim Fisher
OreRockOn.com
Email at http://orerockon.com



-----Original Message-----
From: 
[mailto:] On Behalf Of Lanny R
Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 2010 9:41 AM
To: : A mailing list for rock and gem collectors
Subject: [Rockhounds] New Fish Creek State Park, MT?

Snowbird Mine safe?
Granite Creek-Lolo smoky quartz area...?

The State of Montana, (Fish & Wildlife and State Parks) are planning  
on finalizing the purchase of 41,000 acres of forest land from the  
Nature Conservancy. The lands lie along the Fish Creek drainage which  
many of you are familiar with as the access to Surveyors Creek to get  
to the Snowbird Mine. The involved lands also extend south over the  
pass all the way to the Lolo Pass highway and thus the Granite Creek- 
Lolo smoky quartz area. These were lands formerly owned by Plum Creek  
timber company and were mostly the checkerboard lands from the old  
railroad grant that Burlington Northern had and spun off as the Plum  
Creek timber company. Thus the involved lands run from I-90 south to  
the Lolo highway and are mostly along Fish Creek and Granite Creek but  
extend northeast to Alberton.

A State Park is proposed for 11, 000 acres and the news release  
implies that this would be in the north end somewhere, south of I-90  
near "Alberton Gorge." I don't know exactly where the gorge is, unless  
they mean the narrow area where I-90 passes through on the Clark Fork  
River.

I could not find any maps showing the total lands locations involved,  
am only guessing from the description and the past land ownership of  
the Plum Creek lands.

It looks like this should have no impact on the Snowbird Mine, that is  
fully within the National Forest. Granite Creek Lolo is another story  
though. That is a checkerboard area so 1 square mile blocks of land in  
the smoky quartz area are involved. Those who have collected there  
know that Plum Creek put on some restrictions to access and  
collecting, but apparently never really enforced them, so you know  
where these lands are.

The problem is, that in Montana, State lands are not accessible by the  
public. Montana State lands are closed to access without a permit and  
generally, there are no rockhounding permits. The only exceptions are  
you can enter the lands to hunt if you have a valid hunting license,  
to fish if you have a valid fishing license, etc. The public cannot  
even walk across Montana State lands. So, watch out, the old Plum  
Creek portions of Granite Creek-Lolo may end up being closed.

Regards,

Lanny
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Lanny R 1265861055Thu, 11 Feb 2010 04:04:15 +0000 (UTC)
Thanks Tim.

The press release in the papers stated that this involved land all the  
way down to Lolo. However, looking at the blocks of land colored in  
red on that map does look like 41,000 would involve only those two  
areas west of Alberton as you suggested. That would tie up the north  
half of Fish Creek and an area on the north side of I-90.

Don't know if that means the Nature Conservancy will still own the  
southern blocks along Granite Creek and Lolo. Doubt that group is too  
crazy about wild and crazy people digging holes all over the forest.

Regards,

Lanny
On Feb 10, 2010, at 11:17 AM, Tim wrote: > Lanny, the map is here: > http://www.themontanalegacyproject.org/docume... > > I don't know which the 41,000 acres are but it might be the northern > block > if I read the press release right, it is on either side if the Clark > Fork. > At 640 acres/sq. mi. that's 64 checkerboard squares on the nose, > maybe you > could count them LOL. It was a PITA dealing with them on a couple > projects I > did up there, so good riddance to Plum Creek. Sounds like the state > might > not be any better. Reminds me of Arizona. Makes me even happier to > be here > in good ol' Oregon where I can tromp all over state timber lands and > not be > worried about getting cited for dirt diggling. > > Tim Fisher > OreRockOn.com > Email at http://orerockon.com > > > > -----Original Message----- > From: > [mailto:] On Behalf Of Lanny R > Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 2010 9:41 AM > To: : A mailing list for rock and gem collectors > Subject: [Rockhounds] New Fish Creek State Park, MT? > > Snowbird Mine safe? > Granite Creek-Lolo smoky quartz area...? > > The State of Montana, (Fish & Wildlife and State Parks) are planning > on finalizing the purchase of 41,000 acres of forest land from the > Nature Conservancy. The lands lie along the Fish Creek drainage which > many of you are familiar with as the access to Surveyors Creek to get > to the Snowbird Mine. The involved lands also extend south over the > pass all the way to the Lolo Pass highway and thus the Granite Creek- > Lolo smoky quartz area. These were lands formerly owned by Plum Creek > timber company and were mostly the checkerboard lands from the old > railroad grant that Burlington Northern had and spun off as the Plum > Creek timber company. Thus the involved lands run from I-90 south to > the Lolo highway and are mostly along Fish Creek and Granite Creek but > extend northeast to Alberton. > > A State Park is proposed for 11, 000 acres and the news release > implies that this would be in the north end somewhere, south of I-90 > near "Alberton Gorge." I don't know exactly where the gorge is, unless > they mean the narrow area where I-90 passes through on the Clark Fork > River. > > I could not find any maps showing the total lands locations involved, > am only guessing from the description and the past land ownership of > the Plum Creek lands. > > It looks like this should have no impact on the Snowbird Mine, that is > fully within the National Forest. Granite Creek Lolo is another story > though. That is a checkerboard area so 1 square mile blocks of land in > the smoky quartz area are involved. Those who have collected there > know that Plum Creek put on some restrictions to access and > collecting, but apparently never really enforced them, so you know > where these lands are. > > The problem is, that in Montana, State lands are not accessible by the > public. Montana State lands are closed to access without a permit and > generally, there are no rockhounding permits. The only exceptions are > you can enter the lands to hunt if you have a valid hunting license, > to fish if you have a valid fishing license, etc. The public cannot > even walk across Montana State lands. So, watch out, the old Plum > Creek portions of Granite Creek-Lolo may end up being closed. > > Regards, > > Lanny > -- > _______________________________________________ > Rockhounds@drizzle Mailing List > Subscription Services: > http://lists.drizzle.com/mailman/listinfo/roc... > List Usage Policy: > http://rockhounds.ning.com/page/list-rules > > -- > _______________________________________________ > Rockhounds@drizzle Mailing List > Subscription Services: > http://lists.drizzle.com/mailman/listinfo/roc... > List Usage Policy: > http://rockhounds.ning.com/page/list-rules
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