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Gigabit Interface Input Errors

Ad
Drew Weaver 1257446476Thu, 05 Nov 2009 18:41:16 +0000 (UTC)
Hi,

I noticed I'm seeing some Input errors on a gigabit ethernet interface:

70 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 70 overrun, 0 ignored

the number of input errors seems to increment along with the overrun counter which I assume means that the actual errors are overrun errors.

Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to overrun?

My first inclination is to assume it is not a huge problem because of the amount of packets that are flowing through this interface:

2367831951 packets input, 247924231216 bytes, 0 no buffer 70 out of 2367831951 is a fairly small number but I wanted to check and see if you all had any thoughts.

thanks,
-Drew
Darin Herteen 1257447223Thu, 05 Nov 2009 18:53:43 +0000 (UTC)
Drew,

Overruns are usually caused by the receiving hardware buffer being "flooded" for lack of a better term because the input rate exceeded the
receiver's ability to handle the traffic. 

Darin> From: Darin Herteen 

> To: cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
> Date: Thu, 5 Nov 2009 13:41:16 -0500
> Subject: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors
> 
> Hi,
> 
> I noticed I'm seeing some Input errors on a gigabit ethernet interface:
> 
> 70 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 70 overrun, 0 ignored
> 
> the number of input errors seems to increment along with the overrun counter which I assume means that the actual errors are overrun errors.
> 
> Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to overrun?
> 
> My first inclination is to assume it is not a huge problem because of the amount of packets that are flowing through this interface:
> 
> 2367831951 packets input, 247924231216 bytes, 0 no buffer 70 out of 2367831951 is a fairly small number but I wanted to check and see if you all had any thoughts.
> 
> thanks,
> -Drew
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> cisco-nsp mailing list  cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
> https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/cisc...
> archive at http://puck.nether.net/pipermail/cisco-nsp/
Drew Weaver 1257447486Thu, 05 Nov 2009 18:58:06 +0000 (UTC)
Thanks for responding,

As far as you're aware is there a way to check the hardware buffer to see if this is the case, and is this buffer usually per line card, or per slot (both/either?)

-Drew


From: Drew Weaver 
Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 1:54 PM
To: Drew Weaver; cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
Subject: RE: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors

Drew,

Overruns are usually caused by the receiving hardware buffer being "flooded" for lack of a better term because the input rate exceeded the receiver's ability to handle the traffic.

Darin> From: Drew Weaver 

> To: cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
> Date: Thu, 5 Nov 2009 13:41:16 -0500
> Subject: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors
>
> Hi,
>
> I noticed I'm seeing some Input errors on a gigabit ethernet interface:
>
> 70 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 70 overrun, 0 ignored
>
> the number of input errors seems to increment along with the overrun counter which I assume means that the actual errors are overrun errors.
>
> Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to overrun?
>
> My first inclination is to assume it is not a huge problem because of the amount of packets that are flowing through this interface:
>
> 2367831951 packets input, 247924231216 bytes, 0 no buffer 70 out of 2367831951 is a fairly small number but I wanted to check and see if you all had any thoughts.
>
> thanks,
> -Drew
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> cisco-nsp mailing list cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
> https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/cisc...
> archive at http://puck.nether.net/pipermail/cisco-nsp/
Darin Herteen 1257448767Thu, 05 Nov 2009 19:19:27 +0000 (UTC)
Unfortunately I don't know of anyway to check the hardware buffer(s), and my "guess" is per line card. 

I would also run a "show process cpu" while the overruns incrementing (if you can) to see if the utilization is above 90%. I've heard of this causing overruns in the past. I haven't experienced it myself though.

From: Darin Herteen 
To: synack at live.com; cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 2009 13:58:06 -0500
Subject: RE: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors



















Thanks for responding,

As far as you're aware is there a way to check the hardware
buffer to see if this is the case, and is this buffer usually per line card, or
per slot (both/either?)

-Drew





From: Darin Herteen 
[mailto:synack at live.com] 

Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 1:54 PM

To: Drew Weaver; cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net

Subject: RE: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors





Drew,



Overruns are usually caused by the receiving hardware
buffer being "flooded" for lack of a better term because the input
rate exceeded the receiver's ability to handle the traffic. 



Darin> From: Darin Herteen 



> To: cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net

> Date: Thu, 5 Nov 2009 13:41:16 -0500

> Subject: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors

> 

> Hi,

> 

> I noticed I'm seeing some Input errors on a gigabit ethernet interface:

> 

> 70 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 70 overrun, 0 ignored

> 

> the number of input errors seems to increment along with the overruncounter which I assume means that the actual errors are overrun errors.> 

> Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to overrun?

> 

> My first inclination is to assume it is not a huge problem because of theamount of packets that are flowing through this interface:> 

> 2367831951 packets input, 247924231216 bytes, 0 no buffer 70 out of2367831951 is a fairly small number but I wanted to check and see if you all
had any thoughts.> 

> thanks,

> -Drew

> 

> 

> 

> 

> 

> 

> _______________________________________________

> cisco-nsp mailing list cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net

> https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/cisc...

> archive at http://puck.nether.net/pipermail/cisco-nsp/Bing
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Drew Weaver 1257449954Thu, 05 Nov 2009 19:39:14 +0000 (UTC)
The only time the CPU utilization is above 10% on this system is when BGP Scanner runs, and it was my understanding that BGP scanner shouldn't cause any issues with traffic.

-Drew


From: Drew Weaver 
Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 2:19 PM
To: Drew Weaver; cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
Subject: RE: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors

Unfortunately I don't know of anyway to check the hardware buffer(s), and my "guess" is per line card.

I would also run a "show process cpu" while the overruns incrementing (if you can) to see if the utilization is above 90%. I've heard of this causing overruns in the past. I haven't experienced it myself though.
________________________________
From: Drew Weaver 
To: synack at live.com; cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 2009 13:58:06 -0500
Subject: RE: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors
Thanks for responding,

As far as you're aware is there a way to check the hardware buffer to see if this is the case, and is this buffer usually per line card, or per slot (both/either?)

-Drew


From: Drew Weaver 
Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 1:54 PM
To: Drew Weaver; cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
Subject: RE: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors

Drew,

Overruns are usually caused by the receiving hardware buffer being "flooded" for lack of a better term because the input rate exceeded the receiver's ability to handle the traffic.

Darin> From: Drew Weaver 

> To: cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
> Date: Thu, 5 Nov 2009 13:41:16 -0500
> Subject: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors
>
> Hi,
>
> I noticed I'm seeing some Input errors on a gigabit ethernet interface:
>
> 70 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 70 overrun, 0 ignored
>
> the number of input errors seems to increment along with the overrun counter which I assume means that the actual errors are overrun errors.
>
> Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to overrun?
>
> My first inclination is to assume it is not a huge problem because of the amount of packets that are flowing through this interface:
>
> 2367831951 packets input, 247924231216 bytes, 0 no buffer 70 out of 2367831951 is a fairly small number but I wanted to check and see if you all had any thoughts.
>
> thanks,
> -Drew
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> cisco-nsp mailing list cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
> https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/cisc...
> archive at http://puck.nether.net/pipermail/cisco-nsp/________________________________
Bing brings you maps, menus, and reviews organized in one place. Try it now.<http://www.bing.com/search?q=restaurants&...>
Adrian Minta 1257447521Thu, 05 Nov 2009 18:58:41 +0000 (UTC)
Drew Weaver wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I noticed I'm seeing some Input errors on a gigabit ethernet interface:
>
> 70 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 70 overrun, 0 ignored
>
> the number of input errors seems to increment along with the overrun counter which I assume means that the actual errors are overrun errors.
>
> Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to overrun?
>
> My first inclination is to assume it is not a huge problem because of the amount of packets that are flowing through this interface:
>
> 2367831951 packets input, 247924231216 bytes, 0 no buffer 70 out of 2367831951 is a fairly small number but I wanted to check and see if you all had any thoughts.
>
> thanks,
> -Drew
>ASA firewall ?
Drew Weaver 1257448313Thu, 05 Nov 2009 19:11:53 +0000 (UTC)
Nah this particular instance it is one interface in a 3GE-GBIC-SC in a GSR.

thanks,
-Drew

-----Original Message-----
From: Drew Weaver 
Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 1:59 PM
To: Drew Weaver
Cc: 'cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net'
Subject: Re: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input ErrorsDrew Weaver wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I noticed I'm seeing some Input errors on a gigabit ethernet interface:
>
> 70 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 70 overrun, 0 ignored
>
> the number of input errors seems to increment along with the overrun counter which I assume means that the actual errors are overrun errors.
>
> Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to overrun?
>
> My first inclination is to assume it is not a huge problem because of the amount of packets that are flowing through this interface:
>
> 2367831951 packets input, 247924231216 bytes, 0 no buffer 70 out of 2367831951 is a fairly small number but I wanted to check and see if you all had any thoughts.
>
> thanks,
> -Drew
>ASA firewall ?
Nils Kolstein 1257453130Thu, 05 Nov 2009 20:32:10 +0000 (UTC)
What's the utilization on the other 2 interfaces? I am not familiar with
this specific platform, but it might also be caused by slot/backplane
limitations causing packets to be dropped if the total BW exceeds a certain
(non line-rate) value. I have seen this behaviour on some platforms. 

Regards,

Nils Kolstein> -----Original Message-----
> From: Nils Kolstein 
> bounces at puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Drew Weaver
> Sent: donderdag 5 november 2009 20:12
> To: 'Adrian Minta'
> Cc: 'cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net'
> Subject: Re: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors
> 
> Nah this particular instance it is one interface in a 3GE-GBIC-SC in a
> GSR.
> 
> thanks,
> -Drew
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Nils Kolstein 
> Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 1:59 PM
> To: Drew Weaver
> Cc: 'cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net'
> Subject: Re: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors
> 
> Drew Weaver wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > I noticed I'm seeing some Input errors on a gigabit ethernet
> interface:
> >
> > 70 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 70 overrun, 0 ignored
> >
> > the number of input errors seems to increment along with the overrun
> counter which I assume means that the actual errors are overrun errors.
> >
> > Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to
> overrun?
> >
> > My first inclination is to assume it is not a huge problem because of
> the amount of packets that are flowing through this interface:
> >
> > 2367831951 packets input, 247924231216 bytes, 0 no buffer 70 out of
> 2367831951 is a fairly small number but I wanted to check and see if
> you all had any thoughts.
> >
> > thanks,
> > -Drew
> >
> ASA firewall ?
> 
> --
> Best regards,
> Adrian Minta
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> cisco-nsp mailing list  cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
> https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/cisc...
> archive at http://puck.nether.net/pipermail/cisco-nsp/
Drew Weaver 1257512101Fri, 06 Nov 2009 12:55:01 +0000 (UTC)
The card in total when I last added everything all up is doing about 1.9Gbps and 1.4Mpps

-Drew


-----Original Message-----
From: Drew Weaver 
Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 3:32 PM
To: cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
Subject: Re: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors

What's the utilization on the other 2 interfaces? I am not familiar with
this specific platform, but it might also be caused by slot/backplane
limitations causing packets to be dropped if the total BW exceeds a certain
(non line-rate) value. I have seen this behaviour on some platforms. 

Regards,

Nils Kolstein> -----Original Message-----
> From: Drew Weaver 
> bounces at puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Drew Weaver
> Sent: donderdag 5 november 2009 20:12
> To: 'Adrian Minta'
> Cc: 'cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net'
> Subject: Re: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors
> 
> Nah this particular instance it is one interface in a 3GE-GBIC-SC in a
> GSR.
> 
> thanks,
> -Drew
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Drew Weaver 
> Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 1:59 PM
> To: Drew Weaver
> Cc: 'cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net'
> Subject: Re: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors
> 
> Drew Weaver wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > I noticed I'm seeing some Input errors on a gigabit ethernet
> interface:
> >
> > 70 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 70 overrun, 0 ignored
> >
> > the number of input errors seems to increment along with the overrun
> counter which I assume means that the actual errors are overrun errors.
> >
> > Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to
> overrun?
> >
> > My first inclination is to assume it is not a huge problem because of
> the amount of packets that are flowing through this interface:
> >
> > 2367831951 packets input, 247924231216 bytes, 0 no buffer 70 out of
> 2367831951 is a fairly small number but I wanted to check and see if
> you all had any thoughts.
> >
> > thanks,
> > -Drew
> >
> ASA firewall ?
> 
> --
> Best regards,
> Adrian Minta
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> cisco-nsp mailing list  cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net
> https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/cisc...
> archive at http://puck.nether.net/pipermail/cisco-nsp/
Gert Doering 1257453533Thu, 05 Nov 2009 20:38:53 +0000 (UTC)
Hi,On Thu, Nov 05, 2009 at 01:41:16PM -0500, Drew Weaver wrote:
> Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to overrun?"Hardware too slow error" - packets arrive in short bursts at line rate,
and your router cannot handle that.

For example, an NPE-G1 will handle packets at, say, 300 mbit/sec if they
come in evenly spaced - packet<pause>packet<pause>packet<pause> - but if
1000 packets arrive back-to-back and then a longer pause, it will overrun
the buffers.

There's not much you can do, except "get a hardware forwarding box" 
or "just accept it, and only worry if the errors increase more frequently".

We do some of both :-)

gert
Ryan West 1257455433Thu, 05 Nov 2009 21:10:33 +0000 (UTC)
Hi,> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ryan West 
> bounces at puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Gert Doering
> Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 3:39 PM> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ryan West 
> bounces at puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Gert Doering
> Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 3:39 PM
.
> 
> There's not much you can do, except "get a hardware forwarding box"
> or "just accept it, and only worry if the errors increase more
> frequently".Hopefully I'm not completing high-jacking here, but I have seen similar issues on the 4500 w/WS-X4548-GB-RJ45 line cards.  The fabric has 6gbps per slot, so the oversubscription is 8:1.  The best tell tale sign that I'm hitting oversubscription are input errors with no CRC or overruns, like below:

  30 second input rate 6394000 bits/sec, 719 packets/sec
  30 second output rate 722000 bits/sec, 481 packets/sec
     770898484 packets input, 957181248327 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 594832 broadcasts (560167 multicast)
     0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     282191 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     455543646 packets output, 153140605424 bytes, 0 underruns 

Is there a more systematic approach to detecting this?  I've gone through some docs and most useful information is geared toward the 6500, such as http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switch....  Currently I have to use a combination of interface statistics and historical Cacti graphs to narrow down over-utilized port ranges.

Thanks,

-ryan
NMaio at guesswho.com 1257456294Thu, 05 Nov 2009 21:24:54 +0000 (UTC)
Ryan,
I have similar problems with 4500s so I keep a close eye on the detailed counters.  In particular I watch the transmit drops and also the receive buffer stats.  Pauses frames also indicate a problem in our environment and I would expect in some other environments.  It's a long output but I have always found it very helpful since the reason for the input/output errors are not always evident in a show interface output.
show int counters detail

Port       Tx-Drops-Queue-1  Tx-Drops-Queue-2 Tx-Drops-Queue-3  Tx-Drops-Queue-4
Gi5/34                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/35                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/36                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/37                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/38                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/39                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/40                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/41                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/42                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/43                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/44                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/45                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/46                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/47                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi5/48                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi7/1           21257797383                 0                0                 0

show int counters detail
..
...
Port         Rx-No-Pkt-Buff     RxPauseFrames    TxPauseFrames   PauseFramesDrop
Gi4/26                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/27                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/28                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/29                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/30                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/31                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/32                    0            107830                0                 0
Gi4/33                    0                 0           346468                 0
Gi4/34                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/35                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/36                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/37                    0                 0             9056                 0
Gi4/38                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/39                    0                 0                0                 0
Gi4/40                    0                 0           240746                 0
Gi4/41                 1548                 0                0                 0
Gi4/42                    0                 0          1390048                 0

Nick



-----Original Message-----
From: NMaio at guesswho.com 
Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 4:11 PM
To: Gert Doering; Drew Weaver
Cc: 'cisco-nsp at puck.nether.net'
Subject: Re: [c-nsp] Gigabit Interface Input Errors

Hi,> -----Original Message-----
> From: NMaio at guesswho.com 
> bounces at puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Gert Doering
> Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 3:39 PM> -----Original Message-----
> From: NMaio at guesswho.com 
> bounces at puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Gert Doering
> Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 3:39 PM
.
> 
> There's not much you can do, except "get a hardware forwarding box"
> or "just accept it, and only worry if the errors increase more
> frequently".Hopefully I'm not completing high-jacking here, but I have seen similar issues on the 4500 w/WS-X4548-GB-RJ45 line cards.  The fabric has 6gbps per slot, so the oversubscription is 8:1.  The best tell tale sign that I'm hitting oversubscription are input errors with no CRC or overruns, like below:

  30 second input rate 6394000 bits/sec, 719 packets/sec
  30 second output rate 722000 bits/sec, 481 packets/sec
     770898484 packets input, 957181248327 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 594832 broadcasts (560167 multicast)
     0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     282191 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     455543646 packets output, 153140605424 bytes, 0 underruns 

Is there a more systematic approach to detecting this?  I've gone through some docs and most useful information is geared toward the 6500, such as http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switch....  Currently I have to use a combination of interface statistics and historical Cacti graphs to narrow down over-utilized port ranges.

Thanks,

-ryan
Ryan West 1257458207Thu, 05 Nov 2009 21:56:47 +0000 (UTC)
Nick,

Thanks, this is what I was looking for.> 
> show int counters detail
> 
> Port       Tx-Drops-Queue-1  Tx-Drops-Queue-2 Tx-Drops-Queue-3  Tx-
> Drops-Queue-4
> 0
> Gi7/1           21257797383                 0                0
> 0
> 
> show int counters detail
> ..
> ...
> Port         Rx-No-Pkt-Buff     RxPauseFrames    TxPauseFrames
> PauseFramesDrop
> 0
> Gi4/32                    0            107830                0
> 0
> Gi4/37                    0                 0             9056
> 0
> Gi4/38                    0                 0                0
> 0
> Gi4/39                    0                 0                0
> 0
> Gi4/40                    0                 0           240746
> 0
> Gi4/41                 1548                 0                0
> 0
> Gi4/42                    0                 0          1390048
> 0
> 
> Nick
>-ryan
Ivan Gasparik 1258105996Fri, 13 Nov 2009 09:53:16 +0000 (UTC)
Hi folks,

Does anybody know what causes the router to drop packets as
overrun and what as an input queue drops. There are two show interface
examples of NPE-G1, both with input hold-queue set to 4096. The first
one only shows 153 overrun packets, in the second interface output
you can see overruns together with input queue drops:

GigabitEthernet0/1 is up, line protocol is up 
...
  Input queue: 0/4096/0/58537 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue: 0/4096 (size/max)
  1 minute input rate 43040000 bits/sec, 6944 packets/sec
  1 minute output rate 23483000 bits/sec, 7180 packets/sec
     2609205324 packets input, 3131277093 bytes, 6 no buffer
     Received 2871721 broadcasts (0 IP multicasts)
     0 runts, 0 giants, 2 throttles
     153 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 153 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 watchdog, 2871721 multicast, 0 pause input

GigabitEthernet0/3 is up, line protocol is up 
...
  Input queue: 0/4096/4258004/961350 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 44638280
  Queueing strategy: Class-based queueing
  Output queue: 6/4096/0 (size/max total/drops)
  1 minute input rate 15685000 bits/sec, 5120 packets/sec
  1 minute output rate 28836000 bits/sec, 5171 packets/sec
     2503236491 packets input, 208082741 bytes, 589462 no buffer
     Received 1329388071 broadcasts (13 IP multicasts)
     0 runts, 12 giants, 960 throttles
     128042 input errors, 12 CRC, 0 frame, 128018 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 watchdog, 1424143105 multicast, 0 pause input

Thanks
Ivan
On Thursday 05 November 2009 21:38:53 Gert Doering wrote: > Hi, > > On Thu, Nov 05, 2009 at 01:41:16PM -0500, Drew Weaver wrote: > > Does anyone have any tips on finding out what is causing it to > > overrun? > > "Hardware too slow error" - packets arrive in short bursts at line rate, > and your router cannot handle that. > > For example, an NPE-G1 will handle packets at, say, 300 mbit/sec if they > come in evenly spaced - packet<pause>packet<pause>packet<pause> - but if > 1000 packets arrive back-to-back and then a longer pause, it will > overrun the buffers. > > There's not much you can do, except "get a hardware forwarding box" > or "just accept it, and only worry if the errors increase more > frequently". > > We do some of both :-) > > gert >
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